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Hide Section - GENERAL INFORMATION

GENERAL INFORMATION

Committee NameUnited States Advisory Commission on Public DiplomacyAgency NameDepartment of State
Fiscal Year2019Committee Number1322
Original Establishment Date1/1/1948Committee StatusChartered
Actual Termination Date12/16/2011Committee URLhttp://www.state.gov/pdcommission
New Committee This FYNoPresidential Appointments*Yes
Terminated This FYNoMax Number of Members*7
Current Charter Date4/29/2019Designated Fed Officer Position Title*Executive Director, Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy
Date Of Renewal Charter4/29/2021Designated Federal Officer PrefixDr.
Projected Termination Date Designated Federal Officer First Name*Vivian
Exempt From Renewal*NoDesignated Federal Officer Middle NameS.
Specific Termination AuthorityP.L. 111-70 (2009)Designated Federal Officer Last Name*Walker
Establishment Authority*Statutory (Congress Created)Designated Federal Officer Suffix
Specific Establishment Authority*22 U.S.C. 1469Designated Federal Officer Phone*(202) 632-6382
Effective Date Of Authority*1/27/1948Designated Federal Officer Fax*
Committee Type*ContinuingDesignated Federal Officer Email*walkervs@state.gov
Presidential*No
Committee Function*National Policy Issue Advisory Board
Hide Section - RECOMMENDATION/JUSTIFICATIONS

RECOMMENDATION/JUSTIFICATIONS

Agency Recommendation*Continue
Legislation to Terminate RequiredNo
Legislation StatusNot Applicable
How does cmte accomplish its purpose?*The Advisory Commission assesses U.S.-government activities intended to understand, inform, and influence foreign publics. It proposes to the President, the Secretary of State, and Members of Congress recommendations concerning Public Diplomacy, and appraises the effectiveness of Public Diplomacy policies and programs carried out by the Department of State in both Washington and abroad. Commission members and staff interact regularly with Department and Congressional officials and hold open meetings four times a year. The Commission also works with partner institutions and individual researchers to bring outside expertise and best practices to inform Public Diplomacy and international broadcasting startegy.
How is membership balanced?*The seven-member Commission is by law bipartisan, with no more than four members from any one political party. Members are appointed by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate; the President designates the chairman. As of September 2018, there were two Republican and two Democrat members on the Commission (and three vacant seats), with a Democrat and Republican serving as Chairman and Vice Chairman, respectively. Commissioners serve without compensation and are chosen from a broad cross section of professions, including law, business, public relations, academia, and diplomacy. Members are appointed for three-year terms, but they may continue to serve once their term has expired until their replacement has been nominated by the White House and confirmed by the Senate. A new member was confirmed in May 2016, and two of the members were re-confirmed for appointments ending in July 2018. Commission staff include an executive director, a Foreign Service Senior Advisor, and a part-time administrative assistant. The biographies of the Commission members can be found at http://www.state.gov/pdcommission/members/index.htm. The biographies of the Commission's staff members can be found at http://www.state.gov/pdcommission/staff/index.htm.
How frequent & relevant are cmte mtgs?*The Commission meets four times a year in a public forum. These meetings are instrumental in providing a platform for Public Diplomacy practitioners and other interested stakeholders to engage the Commissioners in person. The meetings are on topics that are relevant to current issues in Public Diplomacy, including findings of recent Commission reports. Transcripts of minutes of those meetings can be found at http://www.state.gov/pdcommission/meetings/index.htm. Recommendations are in the meeting minutes. Members of the public who attend the meetings include members of the media, embassy officials, academicians, and think tank and congressional staff. Commission recommendations are sometimes cited in the media. In addition to meetings, the Commissioners also conduct domestic and overseas fact-finding trips that inform the Comprehensive Annual Report, mandated in the Commission's reauthorization language. The Commission also maintains a Facebook page and Twitter account to increase both the reach of the Commission and the ability to hear from and communicate with the public, Members and staff of Congress, and members of the Executive Branch.
Why advice can't be obtained elsewhere?*Since 1948, Congress has required this Commission and its predecessors “to represent the public interest” in looking broadly at U.S. government activities concerning Public Diplomacy. No other source in government or the private sector provides a comparable, independent citizens perspective. The Commissioners are the only individuals from the private sector who have been appointed to advise the President and Secretary of State on Public Diplomacy initiatives. They bring unique perspectives from business, politics, and government.
Why close or partially close meetings?Offical meetings of the Commission are open to the public unless a determination has been made in accordance with Section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Commission Act that a meeting or a portion of a meeting should be closed to the public.
Recommendation RemarksUnder Section 702 of the Department of State Authorities Act, Fiscal Year 2017 (P.L. 114-323), which amended the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (22 US.c. 6553), Congress re-authorized the Commission until October 1, 2020.

According to the Commission's charter, Commission members, once confirmed by the Senate, serve three-year terms. Upon the expiration of a member's term of office, the member continues to serve until a successor is appointed and qualified.

The ACPD's Charter can be found at http://www.state.gov/pdcommission/charter/index.htm

The Commission members meet in an open, public forum four times each fiscal year. Transcripts of minutes of these meetings can be found at http://www.state.gov/pdcommission/meetings/index.htm.

The ACPD releases an annual "Comprehensive Report on Public Diplomacy and International Broadcasting" as well as ad hoc reports on specialized subjects. Copies of the Commission's reports can be found at https://www.state.gov/pdcommission/reports/index.htm.
Hide Section - PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Outcome Improvement To Health Or Safety*NoAction Reorganize Priorities*Yes
Outcome Trust In GovernmentNoAction Reallocate ResourcesYes
Outcome Major Policy ChangesNoAction Issued New RegulationsYes
Outcome Advance In Scientific ResearchNoAction Proposed LegislationYes
Outcome Effective Grant MakingNoAction Approved Grants Or Other PaymentsNo
Outcome Improved Service DeliveryNoAction OtherNo
Outcome Increased Customer SatisfactionNoAction Comment
Outcome Implement Laws/Reg RequirementsNoGrants Review*No
Outcome OtherYesNumber Of Grants Reviewed0
Outcome CommentIn FY-2018, the ACPD issued two reports with a total of 24 recommendations. The first was the 2017 Comprehensive Annual Report on Public Diplomacy and International Broadcasting, released in October 2017, which included 20 recommendations to Congress, the Department of State, and the Broadcasting Board of Governors (now the U.S. Agency for Global Media). (The report can be found at https://www.state.gov/documents/organization/274950.pdf.) The second report was issued in May 2018 and entitled Optimizing Engagement: Research, Evaluation and Learning in Public Diplomacy, which contained four recommendations for improving research and assessment efforts supporting U.S. government public diplomacy activities. (The report can be found at (http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/281616.pdf.)The May 2018 report was informed, in part, by a Commission-organized Research, Evaluation, and Learning Summit held in February 2018 that highlighted best practices and identified key gaps and areas for improvement in efforts to continually assess, learn, and improve the effectiveness of Public Diplomacy programs. By bringing together members of the State Department's research and evaluation community with experts from the inter-agency and the private sector, the summit supported efforts to measure and design impactful Public Diplomacy programs. Coinciding with the summit, the ACPD commissioned M&C Saatchi World Services to conduct an audit of global best practices in assessing Public Diplomacy programs, the results of which were also included in the report. The Commission continues to monitor and advise on the implementation of the above recommendations, as well as other outstanding recommendations from earlier reports as detailed below.The Commission's report, Data Driven Public Diplomacy: Progress Towards Measuring the Impact of Public Diplomacy and International Broadcasting Activities (http://www.state.gov/pdcommission/reports/231733.htm) made 15 recommendations on structural and methodological change for Public Diplomacy evaluation. The report was released on September 16, 2014, and most of its recommendations have been implemented. In FY 2015, FY 2016, and FY 2017, the Commission monitored the implementation of these recommendations, in addition to roughly 45 additional ones from the Comprehensive Annual Reports on Public Diplomacy and International Broadcasting, as well as the Getting the People Part Right II, which focused on human resources and the white paper Reimagining Public Diplomacy’s Organizational Structure at the U.S. Department of State. Both of these latter reports have impacted strategic planning within the policy shop (R/PPR) of the Office of the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (R), which created a new position to oversee Public Diplomacy human resources and created a task force of professionals to develop a shared services Public Diplomacy model. The Commission's 2017 report Can Public Diplomacy Survive the Internet helped raise awareness regarding the threats and possibilities of artificial intelligence as it relates to international communication. The report directly shaped the State Department's thinking on policies guiding the use and understanding of artificial intelligence.Number Of Grants Recommended0
Cost Savings*$1,000,001 - $5,000,000Dollar Value Of Grants Recommended$0.00
Cost Savings CommentThe Commission is able to complete its reports for roughly $75,000, which is about 60 percent of its total operating budget of $134,000. Comparable studies would likely been contracted to an institution for millions of dollars (in particular, the Comprehensive Annual Report on Public Diplomacy and International Broadcasting, which includes data collected from over 20 offices and exceeds 350 pages and 130,000 words.Grants Review CommentNA
Number Of Recommendations*112Access Contact Designated Fed. Officer*Yes
Number Of Recommendations CommentThe Commission was established in 1948 and has issued approximately 60 reports since then. In FY-2018, the ACPD issued two reports with a total of 24 recommendations. The first was the 2017 Comprehensive Annual Report on Public Diplomacy and International Broadcasting, released in October 2017, which included 20 recommendations to Congress, the Department of State, and the Broadcasting Board of Governors (now the U.S. Agency for Global Media). The second report was issued in May 2018 and entitled Optimizing Engagement: Research, Evaluation and Learning in Public Diplomacy, which contained four recommendations for improving research and assessment efforts supporting U.S. government public diplomacy activities.The Commission's first report since its reinstatement in July 2013, Data Driven Public Diplomacy: Progress Towards Measuring the Impact of Public Diplomacy and International Broadcasting Activities (released on September 16, 2014) made 15 recommendations on structural and methodological change for Public Diplomacy evaluation. The Commission has made roughly 48 additional recommendations total in its FY 2015, FY 2016, and FY 2017 Comprehensive Annual Reports on Public Diplomacy and International Broadcasting, as well as the Getting the People Part Right II report, which focused on human resources, and the white paper Reimagining Public Diplomacy’s Organizational Structure at the U.S. Department of State issued in May 2016.A report issued on June 25, 2008, entitled, Getting the People Part Right -- A Report on the Human Resources Dimension of U.S. Public Diplomacy, contained 11 recommendations.Access Agency WebsiteYes
% of Recs Fully Implemented*30.00%Access Committee WebsiteYes
% of Recs Fully Implemented CommentSince the Commission's reinstatement in July 2013, roughly 55 percent of its recommendations in its reports have been implemented or are in the process of being implemented.Access GSA FACA WebsiteYes
% of Recs Partially Implemented*25.00%Access PublicationsYes
% of Recs Partially Implemented CommentSince the Commission's reinstatement in July 2013, roughly 55 percent of its recommendations in its reports have been implemented or are in the process of being implemented.Access OtherNo
Agency Feedback*YesAccess CommentThe Commission will continue to actively distribute and make available information products it develops for the Congress, the executive branch, and the public. The Commission provides, whenever possible, raw information for the public to review as well as documents with analysis and recommendations. All meeting announcements, minutes, transcripts -- in addition to the Commission's reports and white papers -- are available at http://www.state.gov/pdcommission/index.htm.
Agency Feedback CommentThe Commission actively seeks feedback from the organizations it appraises and issues advise to, including the Departments of State and Defense, the U.S. Agency for Global Media (formerly the Broadcasting Board of Governors), the White House / National Security Staff, and Congress. Thus far, the recommendations from its seven core reports have been welcomed by the Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, the Office of Management and Budget, the House Foreign Affairs Committee, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and the Senate Appropriations Committee.Narrative Description*The Commission is a citizen’s panel that advises the President, Secretary of State, and Congress on Public Diplomacy matters. This includes efforts by the U.S. government and the private sector that seek to engage, understand, inform, and influence foreign publics so that they, in turn, encourage their government to support U.S. foreign policy priorities. In this role, the Commissioners utilize their wide range of experience within the areas of management, communications, public affairs, government, and international relations to assess U.S. government Public Diplomacy programs and activities. The U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy, a bipartisan presidentially appointed panel created by Congress, has continually served since its inception in 1948.
Hide Section - COSTS

COSTS

Payments to Non-Federal Members* Est Payments to Non-Fed Members Next FY* 
Payments to Federal Members* Est. Payments to Fed Members Next FY* 
Payments to Federal Staff* Estimated Payments to Federal Staff* 
Payments to Consultants* Est. Payments to Consultants Next FY* 
Travel Reimb. For Non-Federal Members* Est Travel Reimb Non-Fed Members nextFY* 
Travel Reimb. For Federal Members* Est Travel Reimb For Fed Members* 
Travel Reimb. For Federal Staff* Est. Travel Reimb to Fed Staff Next FY* 
Travel Reimb. For Consultants* Est Travel Reimb to Consultants Next FY* 
Other Costs Est. Other Costs Next FY* 
Total Costs$0.00Est. Total Next FY*$0.00
Federal Staff Support (FTE)* Est. Fed Staff Support Next FY* 
Hide Section - Custom Links

Custom Links

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Hide Section - MEMBERS,MEETINGS AND ADVISORY REPORTS

MEMBERS,MEETINGS AND ADVISORY REPORTS

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Hide Section - CHARTERS AND RELATED DOCS

CHARTERS AND RELATED DOCS

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Hide Section - DATA FROM PREVIOUS YEARS

DATA FROM PREVIOUS YEARS

Committee

Data from Previous Years

 
ActionCommittee System IDCommittee NameFiscal Year
 COM-001609United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2017
 COM-002700United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2016
 COM-003742United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2015
 COM-004770United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2014
 COM-005871United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2013
 COM-007077United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2012
 COM-007931United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2011
 COM-009062United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2010
 COM-010062United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2009
 COM-010983United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2008
 COM-011998United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2007
 COM-012803United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2006
 COM-013776United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2005
 COM-014734United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2004
 COM-015753United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2003
 COM-016690United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2002
 COM-017496United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2001
 COM-018646United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2000
 COM-019945United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy1999
 COM-020255United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy1998
 COM-021134United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy1997
 COM-033670United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy2018