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Committee Detail

Note: An Annual Comprehensive Review, as required by §7 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, is conducted each year on committee data entered for the previous fiscal year (referred to as the reporting year). The data for the reporting year is not considered verified until this review is complete and the data is moved to history for an agency/department. See the Data From Previous Years section at the bottom of this page for the committee’s historical, verified data.

Details on agency responses to committee recommendations can be found under the Performance Measures section for each committee in the fields “Agency Feedback” and “Agency Feedback Comment.”


HHS - 812 - Board of Scientific Counselors Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases - Authorized by Law
Hide Section - GENERAL INFORMATION

GENERAL INFORMATION

Committee NameBoard of Scientific Counselors Deputy Director for Infectious DiseasesAgency NameDepartment of Health and Human Services
Fiscal Year2022Committee Number812
Original Establishment Date11/17/1962Committee StatusChartered
Actual Termination Date Committee URLhttps://www.cdc.gov/ddid/bsc.html
New Committee This FYNoPresidential Appointments*No
Terminated This FYNoMax Number of Members*28
Current Charter Date10/31/2021Designated Fed Officer Position Title*Senior Advisor for Policy and Communications, Office of the Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases, CDC
Date Of Renewal Charter10/31/2023Designated Federal Officer Prefix
Projected Termination Date Designated Federal Officer First Name*Hilary
Exempt From Renewal*NoDesignated Federal Officer Middle Name
Specific Termination AuthorityDesignated Federal Officer Last Name*Eiring
Establishment Authority*Authorized by LawDesignated Federal Officer SuffixMPH
Specific Establishment Authority*42 U.S.C. 217aDesignated Federal Officer Phone*(770) 488-3901
Effective Date Of Authority*11/17/1962Designated Federal Officer Fax*770-488-1317
Exempt From EO 13875 Discretionary CmteNot ApplicableDesignated Federal Officer Email*heiring@cdc.gov
Committee Type*Continuing
Presidential*No
Committee Function*Scientific Technical Program Advisory Board
Hide Section - RECOMMENDATION/JUSTIFICATIONS

RECOMMENDATION/JUSTIFICATIONS

Agency Recommendation*Continue
Legislation to Terminate RequiredNot Applicable
Legislation StatusNot Applicable
How does cmte accomplish its purpose?*The Board provides critical advice and direction to the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services (HHS); the CDC Office of the Director; the Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases; and the infectious disease national centers on improving the Agency’s efforts to prevent and control infectious diseases. The Board comprises a highly respected and diverse group of nationally and internationally recognized experts, who bring extensive experience to help CDC ensure sound public health policies and programmatic balance for current and emerging infectious disease threats. Their candid advice and critiques help to improve program focus and maximize program effectiveness. Throughout the years, the Board has provided valuable advice to CDC for strengthening public health capacity at the national, state, and local levels; enhancing preparedness to address new diseases and public health challenges; developing new tools for detecting and controlling infectious diseases; and implementing science-based programs to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. The Board's global scientific expertise plays an integral role in helping CDC's infectious disease programs stay abreast of current health trends and appropriate scientific directions, thereby ensuring the highest quality prevention and control efforts.
How is membership balanced?*The Board consists of 17 public members, including the Chair. Members are selected by the Secretary from authorities knowledgeable in the fields relevant to the issues addressed by the infectious disease national centers (e.g., respiratory diseases, healthcare-associated infections, antimicrobial resistance, foodborne diseases, zoonotic and vector-borne diseases, sexually transmitted diseases, preparedness) and related specialties, including clinical and public health practice (including state and local health departments), laboratory practice, research, diagnostics, microbiology, immunology, molecular biology, bioinformatics, health policy/communications, and industry. The Board provides the expertise to help strengthen these disciplines and the scientific validity of CDC's infectious disease programs. In addition to the broad professional expertise, a diverse membership, including the geographical location of members, helps to ensure that the committee provides a well-balanced perspective.
How frequent & relevant are cmte mtgs?*In FY 2022, the full Board and its workgroups met less often than in a typical year because Board and workgroup members, as well as CDC’s infectious disease leadership and staff, were heavily involved in the response by CDC, state and local health departments, and other organizations to the COVID-19 pandemic. The full Board convened once in FY 2022 through one webinar. Typically, between meetings, the Board is kept abreast of CDC’s infectious disease activities through periodic emails and informational calls. In addition, two of the Board’s four workgroups convened in FY 2022 as follows: The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Surveillance Working Group met once through a 2-day teleconference, and the Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) Task Force met three times through 1-day teleconferences. The Infectious Disease Laboratory Working Group and the Vaccine Hesitancy Work Group did not meet. The efforts of the full Board and its workgroups in updating and prioritizing goals and directions to meet both ongoing and evolving public health needs for infectious diseases are critical to national and global health. An important component of the activities of the Board and its workgroups is ensuring that the public health, clinical, and research communities are aware of and focused on changing health challenges and priorities. The Board’s advice is extremely beneficial to the CDC Director; the Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases; the Directors of the infectious disease national centers; and the scientists and managers within the programs. Examples of the Board’s activities over the past fiscal year include providing information and advice to 1) help CDC address issues related to COVID-19 testing; 2) help CDC address a decrease in routine immunizations during the COVID-19 pandemic; 3) help CDC ensure that health disparities are measurable across localities; 4) help CDC maintain or expand Vector-Borne Disease Regional Centers of Excellence; 5) help advance CDC’s efforts to strengthen childhood immunization programs and advocacy in low- and middle-income countries; and 6) help advance CDC’s efforts to reduce rates of tuberculosis globally.

The Board also provided comments on action steps proposed by its workgroups. The FMSA Surveillance Working Group is charged with providing input to CDC, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and HHS (e.g., through the BSC/DDID) on ways to enhance foodborne illness surveillance. Examples of the group’s work during FY 2022 include providing input to the Board on 1) impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on enteric disease surveillance and future planning and 2) initiatives underway to address gaps in foodborne illness surveillance. The AFM Task Force aids in the ongoing investigation to define the cause of AFM and improve treatment and outcomes for patients with AFM. In FY 2021, the group continued to share findings, observations, and outcomes with the Board in two key areas, as defined in the terms of reference: 1) AFM etiologies and pathogenesis and 2) clinical treatment of AFM. The workgroup has continued to evaluate new research and identify persistent gaps in knowledge related to pathogenesis and clinical management of AFM. Also in FY 2022, the workgroup served as an informational network to discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic was affecting AFM diagnosis, clinical management, and research activities.
Why advice can't be obtained elsewhere?*The Board plays an essential role in assisting CDC and the infectious disease national centers in evaluating programs, setting priorities, and developing and achieving goals. Over this next year, the Board and its workgroups will play an important role in helping CDC address several critical public health issues. Examples include providing critical insights regarding the impact of community mitigation efforts on COVID-19 and on respiratory illnesses in general; providing insights into the impact of UVC lighting and room ventilation on COVID-19; providing insights into how the evolving COVID-19 pandemic has affected and is continuing to affect AFM clinical management and research; considering the impacts of the pandemic on enteric disease surveillance; advancing overall vaccine confidence; providing insights into recurring, emerging, and persisting strains of enteric infections identified by whole genome sequencing; and considering the interface of climate change and infectious disease. The board will provide critical information to our infectious disease centers on increasing outbreak responses in the context of post-pandemic public health and climate impact and potential impacts on at risk populations. The Board and its workgroups have significant expertise in these areas that can help CDC best focus resources strategically. The broad infectious disease expertise represented on the Board and centralized in one committee does not exist elsewhere.
Why close or partially close meetings?N/A
Recommendation RemarksNo formal reports from the full Board are required; the Board provides advice and recommendations through various means other than formal reports.

1 SGE ended in FY 22 (Salmaan Keshavjee), 4 extended for 120 days - Jesse Goodman, Mike Loeffelholz, Jeanne Marrazzo, and Alex Billioux), 7 new SGEs joined the board in FY 22 (Jennifer Rakeman, Saad Omer, Lauren Meyer, Susan Phillip, David Malebranche, Jeffrey Duchin, and Virginia Caine)
Hide Section - PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Outcome Improvement To Health Or Safety*YesAction Reorganize Priorities*Yes
Outcome Trust In GovernmentYesAction Reallocate ResourcesNo
Outcome Major Policy ChangesNoAction Issued New RegulationsNo
Outcome Advance In Scientific ResearchYesAction Proposed LegislationNo
Outcome Effective Grant MakingNoAction Approved Grants Or Other PaymentsNo
Outcome Improved Service DeliveryYesAction OtherNo
Outcome Increased Customer SatisfactionYesAction CommentN/A
Outcome Implement Laws/Reg RequirementsNoGrants Review*No
Outcome OtherNoNumber Of Grants Reviewed0
Outcome CommentN/ANumber Of Grants Recommended0
Cost Savings*Unable to DetermineDollar Value Of Grants Recommended$0.00
Cost Savings CommentThe Board’s advice and guidance to CDC’s infectious disease programs could impact cost savings in numerous ways. Through their broad expertise, the members help identify new strategies and opportunities to better target and focus prevention and control efforts, including strengthening existing and building new public-private partnerships. The Board has also been instrumental in helping enhance collaborations across federal organizations, leading to improved responses as well as decreased overlap.Grants Review CommentN/A
Number Of Recommendations*207Access Contact Designated Fed. Officer*Yes
Number Of Recommendations CommentRecommendations were made to CDC leadership and staff during the Board meeting. Because CDC’s infectious disease leadership and staff had significant involvement in the COVID-19 response, much work on implementing the recommendations was on hold. Examples of informal recommendations and individual comments provided during FY 2021 include the need for CDC to 1) develop more guidance on COVID-19 testing; 2) find ways to address the decrease in routine immunizations during the pandemic; 3) address challenges in getting demographic data from laboratories and other systems that CDC could guide at a national level, in terms of measuring health disparities across localities; 4) continue to collaborate with the American Academy of Pediatrics on the Global Immunization Advocacy Grant Program to work with low- and middle-income countries to help strengthen their childhood immunization programs and advocacy; and 5) communicate about how to use strategies to meet the goals of reducing TB rates globally.Access Agency WebsiteYes
% of Recs Fully Implemented*32.00%Access Committee WebsiteYes
% of Recs Fully Implemented CommentCDC has provided guidance for healthcare workers on how to reduce transmission of COVID-19 in their workplaces apart from personal protective equipment, masks, and ventilation control, and other airborne transmissions, and continues to update guidance as science advances. In addition, CDC has provided guidance on COVID-19 mitigation in a variety of public settings, including schools, business, and healthcare settings. Note: The percentage for this fiscal year includes an adjustment from the past to reflect the cumulative percentage of the life of the Board.Access GSA FACA WebsiteYes
% of Recs Partially Implemented*68.00%Access PublicationsYes
% of Recs Partially Implemented CommentCDC continues to develop solutions to increase the rates of routine immunizations, including engaging parent groups, social media, and medical groups such as the American Academy of Pediatrics. CDC also is working closely with various educational entities and the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control to examine the social, emotional, and mental well-being of students due to school closures related to COVID-19. Note: The percentage for this fiscal year includes an adjustment from the past to reflect the cumulative percentage of the life of the Board.Access OtherNo
Agency Feedback*YesAccess CommentThe full minutes of each Board meeting, which includes summaries of workgroup meetings, are posted on CDC's website.
Agency Feedback Comment*At each Board meeting, CDC staff and leadership provide updates on previous recommendations received from the full Board or suggestions from individual Board members and from the working groups. Feedback is also provided less formally via email updates. Recommendations and suggestions by Board members are also regularly categorized and presented to CDC leadership.Narrative Description*In FY 2022, the full Board and its workgroups met less often than in a typical year because Board and workgroup members, as well as CDC’s infectious disease leadership and staff, were heavily involved in the response by CDC, state and local health departments, and other organizations to the COVID-19 pandemic. The full Board convened once in FY 2022 through one webinar. Typically, between meetings, the Board is kept abreast of CDC’s infectious disease activities through periodic emails and informational calls. In addition, two of the Board’s four workgroups convened in FY 2022 as follows: The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Surveillance Working Group met once through a 2-day teleconference, and the Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) Task Force met three times through1-day teleconferences. The Infectious Disease Laboratory Working Group and the Vaccine Hesitancy Work Group did not meet. The efforts of the full Board and its workgroups in updating and prioritizing goals and directions to meet both ongoing and evolving public health needs for infectious diseases are critical to national and global health. An important component of the activities of the Board and its workgroups is ensuring that the public health, clinical, and research communities are aware of and focused on changing health challenges and priorities. The Board’s advice is extremely beneficial to the CDC Director; the Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases; the Directors of the infectious disease national centers; and the scientists and managers within the programs. Examples of the Board’s activities over the past fiscal year include providing information and advice to 1) help CDC address issues related to COVID-19 testing; 2) help CDC address a decrease in routine immunizations during the COVID-19 pandemic; 3) help CDC ensure that health disparities are measurable across localities; 4) help CDC maintain or expand Vector-Borne Disease Regional Centers of Excellence; 5) help advance CDC’s efforts to strengthen childhood immunization programs and advocacy in low- and middle-income countries; and 6) help advance CDC’s efforts to reduce rates of tuberculosis globally.

The Board also provided comments on action steps proposed by its workgroups. The FMSA Surveillance Working Group is charged with providing input to CDC, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and HHS (e.g., through the BSC/DDID) on ways to enhance foodborne illness surveillance. Examples of the group’s work during FY 2021 include providing input to the Board on 1) impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on enteric disease surveillance and future planning and 2) initiatives underway to address gaps in foodborne illness surveillance. The AFM Task Force aids in the ongoing investigation to define the cause of AFM and improve treatment and outcomes for patients with AFM. In FY 2021, the group continued to share findings, observations, and outcomes with the Board in two key areas, as defined in the terms of reference: 1) AFM etiologies and pathogenesis and 2) clinical treatment of AFM. The workgroup has continued to evaluate new research and identify persistent gaps in knowledge related to pathogenesis and clinical management of AFM. Also in FY 2022, the workgroup served as an informational network to discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic was affecting AFM diagnosis, clinical management, and research activities.
Hide Section - COSTS

COSTS

Payments to Non-Federal Members*$10,750.00Est Payments to Non-Fed Members Next FY*$17,000.00
Payments to Federal Members*$4,056.00Est. Payments to Fed Members Next FY*$10,816.00
Payments to Federal Staff*$217,514.00Estimated Payments to Federal Staff*$168,116.00
Payments to Consultants*$0.00Est. Payments to Consultants Next FY*$0.00
Travel Reimb. For Non-Federal Members*$0.00Est Travel Reimb Non-Fed Members nextFY*$23,832.00
Travel Reimb. For Federal Members*$0.00Est Travel Reimb For Fed Members*$0.00
Travel Reimb. For Federal Staff*$0.00Est. Travel Reimb to Fed Staff Next FY*$0.00
Travel Reimb. For Consultants*$0.00Est Travel Reimb to Consultants Next FY*$0.00
Other Costs$4,880.00Est. Other Costs Next FY*$10,733.00
Total Costs$237,200.00Est. Total Next FY*$230,497.00
Date Cost Last Modified11/18/2022 12:07 PMEst. Fed Staff Support Next FY*1.25
Federal Staff Support (FTE)*1.70Est Cost Remarks
Cost Remarks  
Hide Section - Interest Areas

Interest Areas

Category
Area
Agriculture
Agriculture
Animals
Fish and Wildlife
Veterinary Medicine
Basic Science
Microbiology
Computer Technology
Information Technology
Technology
Data
Data Quality
Federal Employment
Federal Employees and Personnel
Food and Drugs
Biotechnology
Food and Drugs
Medical Devices
Government
Federal Government
Internal Federal Government
State Government
Tribal Government
Health
Biodefense
Health Care
Hospitals
Medical Education
Public Health
Treatment
Land
National Parks, Sites, Trails, Recreational Areas Monuments
Medicine
Diseases
Health and Health Research
Illnesses
Research
Basic Research
Research and Development
Science and Technology
Science and Technology
Social Sciences
Risk Communication
Water
Water Use
Hide Section - MEMBERS,MEETINGS AND ADVISORY REPORTS

MEMBERS,MEETINGS AND ADVISORY REPORTS

To View all the members, meetings and advisory reports for this committee please click here
Hide Section - CHARTERS AND RELATED DOCS

CHARTERS AND RELATED DOCS

No Documents Found
Hide Section - DATA FROM PREVIOUS YEARS

DATA FROM PREVIOUS YEARS

Committee

Data from Previous Years

 
ActionCommittee System IDCommittee NameFiscal Year
 COM-040496Board of Scientific Counselors Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases2021
 COM-038771Board of Scientific Counselors Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases2020
 COM-036654Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2019
 COM-034869Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2018
 COM-001951Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2017
 COM-002228Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2016
 COM-004150Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2015
 COM-004549Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2014
 COM-006143Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2013
 COM-006866Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2012
 COM-008336Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2011
 COM-009065Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2010
 COM-010212Board of Scientific Counselors Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases2009
 COM-010986Board of Scientific Counselors Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases2008
 COM-012220Board of Scientific Counselors Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases2007
 COM-012549Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2006
 COM-013722Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2005
 COM-014783Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2004
 COM-016003Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2003
 COM-016505Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2002
 COM-017961Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2001
 COM-018689Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2000
 COM-019767Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases1999
 COM-020643Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases1998
 COM-021469Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases1997