Skip to main content
Content Starts Here GSA Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) Database Skip to main content

Committee Detail

Hide Section - GENERAL INFORMATION

GENERAL INFORMATION

Committee NameBoard of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious DiseasesAgency NameDepartment of Health and Human Services
Fiscal Year2018Committee Number812
Original Establishment Date11/17/1962Committee StatusChartered
Actual Termination Date Committee URLhttp://www.cdc.gov/oid/BSC.html
New Committee This FYNoPresidential Appointments*No
Terminated This FYNoMax Number of Members*30
Current Charter Date10/31/2017Designated Fed Officer Position Title*Senior Advisor, Office of Infectious Diseases, CDC
Date Of Renewal Charter10/31/2019Designated Federal Officer Prefix
Projected Termination Date Designated Federal Officer First Name*Sarah
Exempt From Renewal*NoDesignated Federal Officer Middle Name
Specific Termination AuthorityDesignated Federal Officer Last Name*Wiley
Establishment Authority*Authorized by LawDesignated Federal Officer SuffixMPH
Specific Establishment Authority*42 U.S.C. 217aDesignated Federal Officer Phone*(404) 639-4840
Effective Date Of Authority*11/17/1962Designated Federal Officer Fax*404-235-0511
Committee Type*ContinuingDesignated Federal Officer Email*swiley@cdc.gov
Presidential*No
Committee Function*Scientific Technical Program Advisory Board
Hide Section - RECOMMENDATION/JUSTIFICATIONS

RECOMMENDATION/JUSTIFICATIONS

Agency Recommendation*Continue
Legislation to Terminate RequiredNot Applicable
Legislation StatusNot Applicable
How does cmte accomplish its purpose?*The Board provides critical advice and direction to CDC Office of the Director and the infectious disease national centers on improving the Agency’s efforts to prevent and control infectious diseases. The Board comprises a highly respected and diverse group of nationally and internationally recognized experts, who bring extensive experience to help CDC ensure sound public health policies and programmatic balance for current and emerging infectious disease threats. Their candid advice and critiques help to improve program focus and maximize program effectiveness. Throughout the years, the Board has provided valuable advice to CDC for strengthening public health capacity at the national, state, and local levels; enhancing preparedness to address new diseases and public health challenges; developing new tools for detecting and controlling infectious diseases; and implementing science-based programs to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. The Board's global scientific expertise plays an integral role in helping CDC's infectious disease programs stay abreast of current health trends and appropriate scientific directions, thereby ensuring the highest quality prevention and control efforts.
How is membership balanced?*The Board consists of 17 public members, including the Chair. Members are selected by the Secretary from authorities knowledgeable in the fields relevant to the issues addressed by the infectious disease national centers (e.g., respiratory diseases, antimicrobial resistance, zoonotic and vector-borne diseases, sexually transmitted diseases) and specialties, including clinical and public health practice (including state and local health departments), research and diagnostics, bioinformatics, health policy/communications, and industry, as well as from the general public. The Board provides the expertise to help strengthen these disciplines and the scientific validity of CDC's infectious disease programs. In addition to the broad professional expertise, a diverse membership, including the geographical location of members, helps to ensure that the committee provides a well-balanced perspective.
How frequent & relevant are cmte mtgs?*The full Board convened twice in FY 2018 through two, in-person, 2-day meetings. Between meetings, the Board is kept abreast of CDC’s infectious disease activities through periodic emails and informational calls. In addition, the Board’s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Surveillance Working Group met twice through in-person, 2-day meetings and its Infectious Disease (ID) Laboratory Working Group met once through a 1-day, in-person meeting during FY 2018. In addition, the newly formed Vector-borne Diseases Workgroup of the BSC/OID and the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, met once through a teleconference. The efforts of the full Board and its working groups in updating and prioritizing goals and directions to meet both ongoing and evolving public health needs for infectious diseases are critical to national and global health. An important component of the activities of the Board and its working groups is ensuring that the public health, clinical, and research communities are aware of and focused on changing health challenges and priorities. The Board’s advice is extremely beneficial to the CDC Director; the Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases; the Directors of the infectious disease national centers; and the scientists and managers within the programs. Examples of the Board’s activities over the past fiscal year include providing information to 1) help advance CDC’s efforts to address the U.S. opioid epidemic, including reducing infections associated with opioid use; 2) identify and reduce the burden of waterborne diseases in the United States; 3) advance CDC efforts to reduce antimicrobial resistance, including actions outlined by the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria; 4) better understand and control outbreaks of hepatitis A virus in the United States; and 5) help advance CDC’s efforts to train the next generation of public health workers. The Board also provided comments on action steps proposed by the FMSA Surveillance Working Group and the Infectious Disease Laboratory Working Group. The FMSA Surveillance Working Group is charged with providing advice to CDC, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and HHS (e.g., through the BSC/OID) on ways to enhance foodborne illness surveillance. Examples of the group’s work during FY 2018 include providing guidance on 1) foodborne illness surveillance data needs and approaches to measuring the public health impact of FDA FSMA regulations; 2) the focus and goals of the Interagency Food Safety Analytics Collaboration (IFSAC), a partnership between CDC, FDA, and the Food Safety and Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture; and 3) addressing the opportunities and challenges associated with the increasing use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs). The ID Laboratory Working Group was established in FY 2014 to help guide CDC’s efforts in incorporating the use of new molecular detection tools and computing technologies into public health, ensuring that public health laboratories have access to state-of-technologies for detecting and preventing infectious disease threats. Examples of the group’s work over the past fiscal year include reviewing progress and accomplishments to date of CDC’s advanced molecular detection program and priorities for moving forward. The working group emphasized the importance of ensuring that CDC and the states are able to keep pace with the rapidly advancing field of molecular technologies and outlined specific strategies to meet this challenge, including ways to ensure the availability of specimens for culture as the use of CIDTs increases. The working group also highlighted the importance of onboarding data science at CDC, a discipline with applicability across the public health spectrum. The joint vector-borne diseases (VBDs) working group was established in FY 2018 under the OID and NCEH/ATSDR advisory boards to ensure broad external input on the diverse and complex issues involved in the prevention and control of VBDs. Members were selected in June, and the group held its first meeting (by teleconference) in July. The discussion focused on key issues for CDC in VBDs and vector control, including detecting and responding to exotic VBDs such as Zika and chikungunya; responding to endemic diseases such as West Nile virus; and preventing increases in tickborne diseases.
Why advice can't be obtained elsewhere?*The Board plays an essential role in assisting CDC and the infectious disease national centers in evaluating programs, setting priorities, and developing and achieving goals. Over this next year, the Board and its working groups will play an important role in helping CDC address several critical public health areas. Examples include improving understanding of emerging vector-borne diseases; identifying and implementing short- and long-term public health actions needed to prevent surveillance gaps, particularly regarding surveillance for foodborne illnesses, as the use of molecular detection capacities expand; advancing global health security efforts to ensure preparedness and response capacities for emerging zoonotic diseases, including diseases of pandemic potential; and advancing national and global strategies to control antimicrobial resistance and reduce healthcare-associated infections. The Board and its working groups have significant expertise in these areas that can help CDC best focus resources strategically. The broad infectious disease expertise represented on the Board and centralized in one committee does not exist elsewhere.
Why close or partially close meetings?N/A
Recommendation RemarksNo formal reports from the full Board are required; the Board provides advice and recommendations through various means other than formal reports. The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Surveillance Working Group of the BSC/OID is required by FSMA to submit annual reports to the HHS Secretary and does so through the Board.
Hide Section - PERFORMANCE MEASURES

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Outcome Improvement To Health Or Safety*YesAction Reorganize Priorities*Yes
Outcome Trust In GovernmentNoAction Reallocate ResourcesNo
Outcome Major Policy ChangesNoAction Issued New RegulationsNo
Outcome Advance In Scientific ResearchYesAction Proposed LegislationNo
Outcome Effective Grant MakingNoAction Approved Grants Or Other PaymentsNo
Outcome Improved Service DeliveryYesAction OtherNo
Outcome Increased Customer SatisfactionYesAction CommentN/A
Outcome Implement Laws/Reg RequirementsNoGrants Review*No
Outcome OtherNoNumber Of Grants Reviewed0
Outcome CommentN/ANumber Of Grants Recommended0
Cost Savings*Unable to DetermineDollar Value Of Grants Recommended$0.00
Cost Savings CommentThe Board’s advice and guidance to CDC’s infectious disease programs could impact cost savings in numerous ways. Through their broad expertise, the members help identify new strategies and opportunities to better target and focus prevention and control efforts, including strengthening existing and building new public-private partnerships. The Board has also been instrumental in helping enhance collaborations across federal organizations, leading to improved responses as well as decreased overlap.Grants Review CommentN/A
Number Of Recommendations*140Access Contact Designated Fed. Officer*Yes
Number Of Recommendations CommentRecommendations were made to the decision maker during meetings and through meeting reports, and to the HHS Secretary through the FSMA Working Group’s annual report. Examples of recommendations and individual comments provided during FY 2018 include the need for CDC to 1) determine ways to strengthen the public health workforce, including increasing recruitment to the Epidemic Intelligence Service in response to recent decreases in applications; 2) provide additional guidance to hospital administrators in the use of data from CDC surveillance systems for preventing healthcare-associated infections; 3) maximize resources to address waterborne diseases through increased focus on transmission routes (instead of on pathogens) and through linkages with foodborne disease surveillance; 4) work through the Prevention and Stewardship Working Group of the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PACCARB) to include issues related to companion animals and veterinary medicine; 5) consider promoting in other countries strategies similar to those used in the United States to address latent TB infection; 6) consider expanding the continuum-of-care approach to HIV to include TB and STDs; 7) consider evaluating whether the implementation of molecular testing for group B streptococcal disease has been a cost-effective way to reduce the incidence of infection; 8) support investments in improved availability of antivirals and increased public health messaging to reduce influenza; 9) help countries incorporate technical innovations and efficiencies into medical and public health practices; and 10) continue to focus on populations at risk for both opioid use and infections, including developing guidelines for joint treatment of substance abuse disorder and associated infections. As part of its responsibilities to advance FSMA, the the Board recommended that CDC and its partners 1) improve data on sporadic cases as well as outbreaks of foodborne diseases; 2) continue to evaluate the impact of CIDTs on the epidemiology of foodborne diseases and provide specific guidance on preserving isolates as a short-term solution; 3) increase state-level informatics capacity to address foodborne diseases; and 4) improve sharing of data on foodborne diseases with partners such as regulators and industry. In response to guidance provided by the Infectious Disease Laboratory Working Group (IDLWG), the Board recommended steps to optimize the use of big data and to meet the transformative and disruptive changes resulting from the expanding use of CIDTS. These include working with other federal agencies to consider regulatory issues related to CIDT use and develop model language for CIDT product inserts that outline public health needs.Access Agency WebsiteYes
% of Recs Fully Implemented*35.00%Access Committee WebsiteYes
% of Recs Fully Implemented CommentThe joint vector-borne diseases (VBDs) working group, recommended by the OID and NCEH/ATSDR advisory boards in FY 2017, was established and held its first meeting by teleconference in FY 2018. An initial report back on the workgroup’s discussion will be provided to the full board in FY 2019. Efforts to meet many of the recommendations from the BSC submitted to the HHS Secretary as part of the FSMA Surveillance Working Group’s 2016 annual report are underway, including focus on monitoring the expanding use of CIDTs and ensuring the availability of bacterial isolates, and working with states to improve molecular epidemiologic capacity—activities which also meet challenges identified by the Infectious Disease Laboratory Working Group. CDC’s efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance also include focus on building molecular detection capacity at multiple levels. Much of the advice for consideration regarding opioid-associated infections is being addressed through the Agency-wide effort to combat the opioid epidemic.Access GSA FACA WebsiteYes
% of Recs Partially Implemented*55.00%Access PublicationsYes
% of Recs Partially Implemented CommentRecommendations and advice for consideration regarding ways to reduce opioid-associated infections are being addressed through the Agency-wide effort to combat the opioid epidemic. Recommendations and advice for consideration regarding the need for improved data sharing are also underway, with data on an increasing number of pathogens being rapidly uploaded into a public database to allow immediate access by academic and industry partners.Access OtherNo
Agency Feedback*YesAccess CommentThe full minutes of each Board meeting, which includes summaries of working group meetings, are posted on CDC's website.
Agency Feedback CommentEach Board meeting includes a time for updating progress or other feedback on recommendations received from the full Board or suggestions from individual Board members and from the working groups. Feedback is also provided less formally via email updates. Recommendations and suggestions by Board members are also regularly categorized and presented to CDC leadership.Narrative Description*The full Board convened twice in FY 2018 through two, in-person, 2-day meetings. Between meetings, the Board is kept abreast of CDC’s infectious disease activities through periodic emails and informational calls. In addition, the Board’s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Surveillance Working Group met twice through in-person, 2-day meetings and its Infectious Disease (ID) Laboratory Working Group met once through a 1-day, in-person meeting during FY 2018. In addition, the newly formed Vector-borne Diseases Workgroup of the BSC/OID and the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, met once through a teleconference. The efforts of the full Board and its working groups in updating and prioritizing goals and directions to meet both ongoing and evolving public health needs for infectious diseases are critical to national and global health. An important component of the activities of the Board and its working groups is ensuring that the public health, clinical, and research communities are aware of and focused on changing health challenges and priorities. The Board’s advice is extremely beneficial to the CDC Director; the Deputy Director for Infectious Diseases; the Directors of the infectious disease national centers; and the scientists and managers within the programs. Examples of the Board’s activities over the past fiscal year include providing information to 1) help advance CDC’s efforts to address the U.S. opioid epidemic, including reducing infections associated with opioid use; 2) identify and reduce the burden of waterborne diseases in the United States; 3) advance CDC efforts to reduce antimicrobial resistance, including actions outlined by the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria; 4) better understand and control outbreaks of hepatitis A virus in the United States; and 5) help advance CDC’s efforts to train the next generation of public health workers. The Board also provided comments on action steps proposed by the FMSA Surveillance Working Group and the Infectious Disease Laboratory Working Group. The FMSA Surveillance Working Group is charged with providing advice to CDC, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and HHS (e.g., through the BSC/OID) on ways to enhance foodborne illness surveillance. Examples of the group’s work during FY 2018 include providing guidance on 1) foodborne illness surveillance data needs and approaches to measuring the public health impact of FDA FSMA regulations; 2) the focus and goals of the Interagency Food Safety Analytics Collaboration (IFSAC), a partnership between CDC, FDA, and the Food Safety and Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture; and 3) addressing the opportunities and challenges associated with the increasing use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs). The ID Laboratory Working Group was established in FY 2014 to help guide CDC’s efforts in incorporating the use of new molecular detection tools and computing technologies into public health, ensuring that public health laboratories have access to state-of-technologies for detecting and preventing infectious disease threats. Examples of the group’s work over the past fiscal year include reviewing progress and accomplishments to date of CDC’s advanced molecular detection program and priorities for moving forward. The working group emphasized the importance of ensuring that CDC and the states are able to keep pace with the rapidly advancing field of molecular technologies and outlined specific strategies to meet this challenge, including ways to ensure the availability of specimens for culture as the use of CIDTs increases. The working group also highlighted the importance of onboarding data science at CDC, a discipline with applicability across the public health spectrum. The joint vector-borne diseases (VBDs) working group was established in FY 2018 under the OID and NCEH/ATSDR advisory boards to ensure broad external input on the diverse and complex issues involved in the prevention and control of VBDs. Members were selected in June, and the group held its first meeting (by teleconference) in July. The discussion focused on key issues for CDC in VBDs and vector control, including detecting and responding to exotic VBDs such as Zika and chikungunya; responding to endemic diseases such as West Nile virus; and preventing increases in tickborne diseases.
Hide Section - COSTS

COSTS

Payments to Non-Federal Members*$7,625.00Est Payments to Non-Fed Members Next FY*$46,250.00
Payments to Federal Members*$0.00Est. Payments to Fed Members Next FY*$0.00
Payments to Federal Staff*$230,800.00Estimated Payments to Federal Staff*$229,813.00
Payments to Consultants*$0.00Est. Payments to Consultants Next FY*$0.00
Travel Reimb. For Non-Federal Members*$30,116.00Est Travel Reimb Non-Fed Members nextFY*$46,030.00
Travel Reimb. For Federal Members*$0.00Est Travel Reimb For Fed Members*$0.00
Travel Reimb. For Federal Staff*$1,915.00Est. Travel Reimb to Fed Staff Next FY*$1,930.00
Travel Reimb. For Consultants*$4,212.00Est Travel Reimb to Consultants Next FY*$5,505.00
Other Costs$23,238.00Est. Other Costs Next FY*$23,475.00
Total Costs$297,906.00Est. Total Next FY*$353,003.00
Federal Staff Support (FTE)*1.25Est. Fed Staff Support Next FY*1.22
Hide Section - MEMBERS,MEETINGS AND ADVISORY REPORTS

MEMBERS,MEETINGS AND ADVISORY REPORTS

To View all the members, meetings and advisory reports for this committee please click here
Hide Section - CHARTERS AND RELATED DOCS

CHARTERS AND RELATED DOCS

No Documents Found
Hide Section - DATA FROM PREVIOUS YEARS

DATA FROM PREVIOUS YEARS

Committee

Data from Previous Years

  
ActionCommittee System IDCommittee NameFiscal Year
 COM-001951Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2017
 COM-002228Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2016
 COM-004150Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2015
 COM-004549Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2014
 COM-006143Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2013
 COM-006866Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2012
 COM-008336Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2011
 COM-009065Board of Scientific Counselors Office of Infectious Diseases2010
 COM-010212Board of Scientific Counselors Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases2009
 COM-010986Board of Scientific Counselors Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases2008
 COM-012220Board of Scientific Counselors Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases2007
 COM-012549Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2006
 COM-013722Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2005
 COM-014783Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2004
 COM-016003Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2003
 COM-016505Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2002
 COM-017961Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2001
 COM-018689Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases2000
 COM-019767Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases1999
 COM-020643Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases1998
 COM-021469Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Infectious Diseases1997